"Every day I discover more and more beautiful things. It’s enough to drive one mad. I have such a desire to do everything, my head is bursting with it."

@1 year ago with 15643 notes
sunfoundation:

The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture

When we think about borders, we tend to think of administrative boundaries. Those demarcating lines, often grown out of rivers and mountain ranges or diplomatic quirks, govern our daily lives, and that’s doubly so if we live near a neighboring country or state.
We know that these boundaries are on some level unnatural. Driving around Kansas City, where I live, makes this abundantly clear. Gas price differences aside, it can be difficult to tell which state you’re in, Missouri or Kansas, and the small street of State Line Road does nothing to make it clearer.

sunfoundation:

The Invisible Borders That Define American Culture

When we think about borders, we tend to think of administrative boundaries. Those demarcating lines, often grown out of rivers and mountain ranges or diplomatic quirks, govern our daily lives, and that’s doubly so if we live near a neighboring country or state.

We know that these boundaries are on some level unnatural. Driving around Kansas City, where I live, makes this abundantly clear. Gas price differences aside, it can be difficult to tell which state you’re in, Missouri or Kansas, and the small street of State Line Road does nothing to make it clearer.

@1 year ago with 34 notes
nevver:

Life during wartime
@1 year ago with 684 notes
#war 
teachingliteracy:

amandaonwriting:
The Top 10 Writers Block Quotes
1. Writer’s block? I’ve heard of this. This is when a writer cannot write, yes? Then that person isn’t a writer anymore. I’m sorry, but the job is getting up in the fucking morning and writing for a living. ~Warren Ellis
2. I learned to produce whether I wanted to or not. It would be easy to say oh, I have writer’s block, oh, I have to wait for my muse. I don’t. Chain that muse to your desk and get the job done. ~Barbara Kingsolver
3. All writing is difficult. The most you can hope for is a day when it goes reasonably easily. Plumbers don’t get plumber’s block, and doctors don’t get doctor’s block; why should writers be the only profession that gives a special name to the difficulty of working, and then expects sympathy for it? ~Philip Pullman
4. I’ve often said that there’s no such thing as writer’s block; the problem is idea block. When I find myself frozen–whether I’m working on a brief passage in a novel or brainstorming about an entire book–it’s usually because I’m trying to shoehorn an idea into the passage or story where it has no place. ~Jeffery Deaver
5. You can’t think yourself out of a writing block; you have to write yourself out of a thinking block. ~John Rogers
6. There’s no such thing as writer’s block. That was invented by people in California who couldn’t write. ~Terry Pratchett
7. I haven’t had trouble with writer’s block. I think it’s because my process involves writing very badly. My first drafts are filled with lurching, clichéd writing, outright flailing around. Writing that doesn’t have a good voice or any voice. But then there will be good moments. It seems writer’s block is often a dislike of writing badly and waiting for writing better to happen. ~Jennifer Egan
8.Writer’s block doesn’t exist…lack of imagination does. ~Cyrese Covelli
9. Writer’s Block is just an excuse by people who don’t write for not writing. ~Giando Sigurani 
10. Discipline allows magic. To be a writer is to be the very best of assassins. You do not sit down and write every day to force the Muse to show up. You get into the habit of writing every day so that when she shows up, you have the maximum chance of catching her, bashing her on the head, and squeezing every last drop out of that bitch. ~Lili St. Crow

teachingliteracy:

amandaonwriting:

The Top 10 Writers Block Quotes

1. Writer’s block? I’ve heard of this. This is when a writer cannot write, yes? Then that person isn’t a writer anymore. I’m sorry, but the job is getting up in the fucking morning and writing for a living. ~Warren Ellis

2. I learned to produce whether I wanted to or not. It would be easy to say oh, I have writer’s block, oh, I have to wait for my muse. I don’t. Chain that muse to your desk and get the job done. ~Barbara Kingsolver

3. All writing is difficult. The most you can hope for is a day when it goes reasonably easily. Plumbers don’t get plumber’s block, and doctors don’t get doctor’s block; why should writers be the only profession that gives a special name to the difficulty of working, and then expects sympathy for it? ~Philip Pullman

4. I’ve often said that there’s no such thing as writer’s block; the problem is idea block. When I find myself frozen–whether I’m working on a brief passage in a novel or brainstorming about an entire book–it’s usually because I’m trying to shoehorn an idea into the passage or story where it has no place. ~Jeffery Deaver

5. You can’t think yourself out of a writing block; you have to write yourself out of a thinking block. ~John Rogers

6. There’s no such thing as writer’s block. That was invented by people in California who couldn’t write. ~Terry Pratchett

7. I haven’t had trouble with writer’s block. I think it’s because my process involves writing very badly. My first drafts are filled with lurching, clichéd writing, outright flailing around. Writing that doesn’t have a good voice or any voice. But then there will be good moments. It seems writer’s block is often a dislike of writing badly and waiting for writing better to happen. ~Jennifer Egan

8.Writer’s block doesn’t exist…lack of imagination does. ~Cyrese Covelli

9. Writer’s Block is just an excuse by people who don’t write for not writing. ~Giando Sigurani 

10. Discipline allows magic. To be a writer is to be the very best of assassins. You do not sit down and write every day to force the Muse to show up. You get into the habit of writing every day so that when she shows up, you have the maximum chance of catching her, bashing her on the head, and squeezing every last drop out of that bitch. ~Lili St. Crow

(via michaeldantedimartino)

@1 year ago with 10723 notes

"To our left is a blown-up railway bridge, at the edge of the road is a dead Polish soldier. It really is a strange feeling to know that now we have left Germany and are standing on Polish soil. Far away we hear the weak barking of a machine gun. Somewhere there is a hollow thunder of cannon—the first signs of war."

First Lieutenant W. Reibel on crossing the Polish border, 1 September 1939 (via demons)
@1 year ago with 17 notes
#war 
adventures-of-the-blackgang:

Cruiser “Bayan” c. (1900)Navy Paintings by Artist Vladimir Emyshev
The cruiser Bayan (Russian: Баян) was the lead ship in the Bayan-class of armored cruisers in the Imperial Russian Navy.
It was built in Toulon, France by the Compagnie des Forges et Chantiers de la Méditerranée à la Seine. Its name means “bard” or “storyteller” in Russian.
The Bayan was scuttled during the Russo-Japanese War, and then raised by the Japanese and commissioned as the Aso. She was eventually sunk as a target off Izu Ōshima in 1932.
more

adventures-of-the-blackgang:

Cruiser “Bayan” c. (1900)
Navy Paintings by Artist Vladimir Emyshev

The cruiser Bayan (Russian: Баян) was the lead ship in the Bayan-class of armored cruisers in the Imperial Russian Navy.

It was built in Toulon, France by the Compagnie des Forges et Chantiers de la Méditerranée à la Seine. Its name means “bard” or “storyteller” in Russian.

The Bayan was scuttled during the Russo-Japanese War, and then raised by the Japanese and commissioned as the Aso. She was eventually sunk as a target off Izu Ōshima in 1932.

more

@1 year ago with 24 notes
#war 
@1 year ago with 5945 notes

“Those who have long enjoyed such privileges as we enjoy forget in time that men have died to win them.”

(Source: operationkino, via demons)

@1 year ago with 2342 notes
#gif 
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The Last Beachmaster
On June 6, 1944 across the beaches of Normandy, eighteen Naval officers were assigned as “beachmasters.” The beachmaster would guide the traffic of men, equipment and vehicles as they moved from the English Channel onto the beach and from the beach further into France.
Only 24 at the time, Lt. Commander Joseph Vaghi, Jr. was the youngest beachmaster during the invasion. He landed with the U.S. 6th Naval Beach Battalion at 7:35 a.m. on Omaha Beach, a little over an hour after the first troops had come ashore. The bombing of the beach was still in progress with the platoon coming under constant attack from German soldiers. At one point Lt. Cmdr. Vaghi’s clothes caught fire from a nearby explosion.
He and his platoon remained on the beach for three days as they handled the administration of the largest land-sea invasion in the history of the world. Following the work in France, for which he received the Bronze Star, Lt. Cmdr. Vaghi was reassigned to Okinawa where he participated in the ground invasion.
Following the war Joseph Vaghi, Jr. returned home and enjoyed a career as an architect. The last of the D-Day beachmasters died at the age of 92.
Sources: Chicago Sun-Times, The 6th Beach Battalion Page (which includes Lt. Cmdr. Vaghi’s own description of the D-Day landing)
(Image of the officers of the 6th Beach Battalion prior to D-Day in 1944. Lt. Commander Joseph Vaghi, Jr. is in the back row, second from the left. Courtesy of PBS.org, from the Ken Burns’ documentary, The War.)

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The Last Beachmaster

On June 6, 1944 across the beaches of Normandy, eighteen Naval officers were assigned as “beachmasters.” The beachmaster would guide the traffic of men, equipment and vehicles as they moved from the English Channel onto the beach and from the beach further into France.

Only 24 at the time, Lt. Commander Joseph Vaghi, Jr. was the youngest beachmaster during the invasion. He landed with the U.S. 6th Naval Beach Battalion at 7:35 a.m. on Omaha Beach, a little over an hour after the first troops had come ashore. The bombing of the beach was still in progress with the platoon coming under constant attack from German soldiers. At one point Lt. Cmdr. Vaghi’s clothes caught fire from a nearby explosion.

He and his platoon remained on the beach for three days as they handled the administration of the largest land-sea invasion in the history of the world. Following the work in France, for which he received the Bronze Star, Lt. Cmdr. Vaghi was reassigned to Okinawa where he participated in the ground invasion.

Following the war Joseph Vaghi, Jr. returned home and enjoyed a career as an architect. The last of the D-Day beachmasters died at the age of 92.

Sources: Chicago Sun-Times, The 6th Beach Battalion Page (which includes Lt. Cmdr. Vaghi’s own description of the D-Day landing)

(Image of the officers of the 6th Beach Battalion prior to D-Day in 1944. Lt. Commander Joseph Vaghi, Jr. is in the back row, second from the left. Courtesy of PBS.org, from the Ken Burns’ documentary, The War.)

(via greatestgeneration)

@1 year ago with 34 notes
#war 

"When you love you wish to do things for. You wish to sacrifice for. You wish to serve."

Ernest Hemingway, A Farewell to Arms (via bookmania)
@1 year ago with 1423 notes
booksnbuildings:

Khiva, Uzbekistan.
(photo Fulvio)

booksnbuildings:

Khiva, Uzbekistan.

(photo Fulvio)

@1 year ago with 204 notes
nevver:

365 Days of Hand Lettering
@1 year ago with 1122 notes
minimalmovieposters:

Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hopeby Ninjabot
Tumblr Twitter Facebook Instagram: @theninjabot

minimalmovieposters:

Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hopeby Ninjabot

Tumblr Twitter Facebook Instagram: @theninjabot

@1 year ago with 280 notes
@1 year ago with 4229 notes
@1 year ago with 832 notes